3D scanning the original eft plate

Mad Max Fury Road Shoulder Plate

This year, Robin & I decided to make Furiosa and Max costumes from Mad Max Fury Road.  Most of my gear was available online.  Leathers from South Beach Leather, shirt and boots from Amazon, bracelet from Etsy, and the South African tactical vest from eBay.  The only thing I couldn’t buy was the shoulder plate.  Yes, there’s a guy who sells reproductions, but he was incredibly rude to me.  I swore that I would not do business with someone so rude.  So I had to make my own.

Luckily, a good friend of mine has an AWESOME Road Warrior costume.  He used an original plate for his costume, and still had the left plate from the armor.  He agreed to send it to me so I could make a reproduction.  Ahh, the beauty of 3D modelling…scan the left plate, flip, print, and voila, a shiny and chrome right plate!  ;^)

Once I had the I borrowed another good friend’s Sense 3D scanner.  I placed it on top of an electric revolving lazy susan.

3D scanning the original left plate
3D scanning the original left plate

It took about 10-15 tries to FINALLY get a decent scan.  The big problem with scanning such a thin object is that the scanner loses registration as the object turns so just the edge faces the scanner.

Initial scan of the original plate
Initial scan of the original plate
3D scan of plate with stand removed.
3D scan of plate with stand removed.

You can see some of the grunge/mess along the edges of the plate.  Unfortunately, I was under a deadline, so I didn’t worry about cleaning up the geometry much more than this.  I ended up grinding off the extra material from the print using  a Dremel sanding drum.

When I cut the plate apart to fit onto my Replicator 2x platform, I also booleaned alignment holes into the cut faces.  That way I could use short pieces of 12/2 Romex (copper wire) as alignment pins.  That made it MUCH easier to align the pieces, and also serves to strengthen the joint.  I used a trick from the Open 3DP website to attach the pieces.  You mix MEK and ABS plastic to make a glue/filler for ABS prints.  Then just use a syringe to apply it to the joints.  It fills any voids and melts the ABS part enough to create a bond between pieces.  It’s basically like gluing with acetone, but also fills gaps at the same time.

The three plate pieces assembled.
The three plate pieces assembled.

I applied it fairly heavy, knowing I could fill the voids & just grind off any extra.  Below you’ll see a photo of the replica (before grinding off the extra material & smoothing the edges) and the original plate.

Repro on the left, Original plate on the right.
Repro on the left, Original plate on the right.

After a basic shaping, I applied Filler/Primer paint, followed by Bondo to smooth the model.  After that some Bondo glazing putty to fill pinholes/cracks/divots/etc.

Repro plate with Primer.
Repro plate with Primer.

The final touch was painting it with satin black paint, installing the 3 rivets (beside the neck) from the original plate,  distressing it, and installing it on the shoulder pad I made using the instructions from the Mad Max Costumes website.

Overall, I’m VERY happy with the results of my 3D printed replica plate, and can’t wait to improve other aspects of my Max costume before the next con! Visit our website, Hardscrabble Farm, to download the .stl files for the shoulder plate!

Final plate at Dragon Con
Final plate at Dragon Con

 

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